Bush Hotel

621 S Jackson Street

Bush Hotel from Fifth and Jackson, Seattle, October 15, 2020, HistoryLink photo by David Koch
Bush Hotel, 621 S Jackson St, Seattle, July 19, 2005, Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archives (150246)
Telephone booth outside Bush Hotel, Seattle, 1963, Courtesy Seattle Public Library (spl_shp_21131)
Couple in Basin Street nightclub, Bush Hotel basement, Seattle, December 1, 1945, Courtesy MOHAI (2014.49.16.031.09)
Patrons at Basin Street nightclub, Bush Hotel basement, Seattle, ca. 1944, Courtesy MOHAI (2014.49.14.035.10)
Bush Hotel, Jackson St and Maynard Ave, Seattle, ca. 1925, Courtesy MOHAI (1990.21.1)
Bush Hotel plaque, Seattle, October 15, 2020, HistoryLink photo by David Koch
US Post Office, Bush Hotel, Seattle, October 15, 2020, HistoryLink photo by David Koch

621 S Jackson Street

With 255 rooms and 6 commercial storefronts, the Bush Hotel was the second largest SRO hotel constructed in the CID. Only the Hotel Puget Sound (razed in 1992) exceeded its size with 444 rooms and nine storefronts. The Bush Hotel was constructed in 1915 as another architectural commission that was designed by J. L. McCauley for William Chappell. Originally spelled as “Busch,” Chappell named the building to honor his wife, Margaret Busch Chappell. Chappell wanted this SRO to be the grandest hotel west of Chicago and spared no expense in materials or furnishings that included a granite and mahogany registration desk, a phone paging system for guests, cold running water in every room, and two elevators. The building was constructed with three light wells that formed three bays of the building, which provided natural light and air to interior rooms.

In 1978 the Seattle Chinatown-International District Preservation and Development Authority purchased and restored the building to 170 units of affordable housing with at-grade commercial stores, and a walk-up postal facility. On the south side of the building, the light well wings of the building are visible as is the spectacular dragon mural by artist John Woo.

Walk south to the intersection of Maynard Avenue and King Street.

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