Wa Na Wari

911 24th Avenue

Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Avenue, Seattle, August 8, 2020, HistoryLink photo by David Koch
Clockwise from right; Inye Wokoma, Jill Freidberg, Elisheba Johnson, and Rachel Kessler, Wa Na Wari, Photo by Susan Fried, Courtesy Wa Na Wari
Main exhibition room featuring Lisa Jarrett, Wa Na Wari, Seattle, August 8, 2020, HistoryLink photo by David Koch
Selected works of Lavett Ballard, Seattle, August 8, 2020, HistoryLink photo by David Koch

911 24th Avenue

Wa Na Wari means “Our Home” in Kalabari, the language of the Ijo in Nigeria. This home for Black arts opened its doors in 2019. The home belonged to co-founder Inye Wokoma’s grandparents and now operates as a cultural space for Black artists, musicians, and writers. Programs range from art exhibitions to intimate concerts to community meals to writing workshops. Wa Na Wari fulfills a twofold mission of serving as a model for keeping property ownership within Seattle’s historically Black community, and holding space for Black history and culture. Wa Na Wari also houses the oral history archive of Shelf Life Stories, a project dedicated to preserving the stories of current and former Central District residents.

From Wa Na Wari, continue down 24th Avenue to E Cherry Street. Along the way, note of the Craftsman homes, many of which date to the 1890s or early 1900s. Turn right on E Cherry and then left back onto 23rd Avenue. Proceed south on 23rd Avenue.

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